Monthly Archives: November 2010

Kate Middleton’s Other Famous Relatives

An Associated Press news story Tuesday reported on some of Kate Middleton’s famous relatives. All of the connections they announced, plus many more networked connections, could have been explored visually a year ago in the Family Forest® National Treasure Edition.

The Family Forest® Project is, among a number of other objectives, Networking Family History with Hollywood™. If we explore the descendants of Kate’s Fairfax ancestors who were mentioned in the AP article, we find some interesting entertainment and celebrity cousins of Kate.

She has several cousins associated with comedy, such as talk show host Ellen DeGeneres, Alec Baldwin who portrayed his 14C2R last week on The Mark Twain Prize for American Humor, and Cheers star Ted Danson.

Other Fairfax cousins are AOL founder Steve Case, incoming Wyoming Governor Matt Mead, and 2010 World Series ­­­participants President George Herbert Walker Bush and President George Walker Bush.

If we widen the net just a little further by backing up one more generation to Sir William Gascoigne, also mentioned in the AP article, we find more of Kate’s entertainment and celebrity cousins. They include Anthony Perkins, Cary Elwes, Christopher Reeve, Grace Slick, Hilary Duff, Montgomery Clift, Paul Giamatti, Sarah Ferguson, Mitt Romney, and U.S. Presidents Taft and Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Family Forest® Ancestors-at-a-glance(TM) charts for most of the above mentioned cousins of future queen Kate Middleton can be found here. And for more thought-provoking edutainment, you can visually explore Kate’s and Prince William’s generation-by-generation ancestral pathways leading to many of human history’s most famous ancestors in the Family Forest® National Treasure Edition.

Everyday folks (See FAQ #4), like me, make up most of Kate’s hundreds of thousands of relatives she is already networked to in the Family Forest®. Maybe you or one of your ancestors are one of them?

Just Kate’s known Gascoigne cousins (all royally descended) have surnames including Abbott, Aborn, Adams, Alexander, Allen, Allyn, Ambler, Ames, Anderson, Armistead, Armstrong, Arnold, Asbury, Atkinson, Atteberry, Auchincloss, Austin, Avery, Babbitt, Babcock, Bacon, Bailey, Baker, Baldwin, Ball, Bankhead, Baptist, Barbour, Barker, Barksdale, Barney, Barrett, Bartlett, Barton, Bassett, Beasley, Beauchamp, Bedinger, Beebe, Bellingham, Benning, Benson, Bethell, Bigelow, Billingsley, Bingham, Black, Bladen, Block, Blodgett, Bohannan, Bolton, Bonfils, Booker, Bosworth, Bowen, Bradley, Brattle, Breed, Brewster, Briggs, Brill, Brockway, Brown, Browne, Browning, Bruce, Bryan, Buck, Buckner, Bulkley, Bullock, Burlingame, Burr, Burrows, Burrus, Burwell, Bush, Butler, Button, Byars, Brydges, Byrd, Brydon, Byrne, Cabell, Caldwell, Calhoun, Callaway, Carpenter, Carrier, Carrington, Carter, Cavendish, Chamberlayne, Champlin, Chapman, Chesebro, Chesebrough, Chesley, Christophers, Churchill, Clark, Clarkson, Cobb, Cobbs, Cochran, Cocke, Coit, Colburn, Coleman, Coles, Colfax, Comstock, Cone, Converse, Cooch, Cooke, Cookson, Costello, Cotton, Cox, Crabtree, Crackenthorpe, Crisman, Crocker, Crosby, Cushman, Daingerfield, Dale, Dallas, Daniel, Davidson, Davies, Davis, Day, Dean, Dearborn, Denison, Denniston, Dewey, Dickinson, Dietz, Dillard, Dimmock, Dixon, Dodge, Dougherty, Dowsling, Drake, Duff, Dulany, Durfee, Early, Edmondson, Edrington, Egerton, Eldredge, Ellis, Elwes, Empie, Erickson, Fain, Fairfax, Farwell, Fenwick, Ferguson, Fernsley, Fish, Fisher, Fiske, Fitzhugh, Foote, Foraker, Forbes, Forrest, Foster, Fowler, Franklin, Freeman, Frost, Fry, Fuller, Furlow, Gallup, Gammons, Gardner, Garnsey, Garth, Gates, Gatewood, Geer, Giddings, Gillespie, Glassell, Glenn, Goddard, Goff, Goggin, Good, Gordon, Gore, Gorsuch, Grafton, Grant, Green, Greene, Greenhow, Griffith, Griffin, Guernsey, Guest, Guile, Gwathmey, Hale, Hall, Hallam, Hamilton, Hancock, Harlow, Harris, Harrison, Hazard, Helm, Henderson, Henley, Henry, Herbert, Hereford, Herman, Herrick, Hill, Hinckley, Hoag, Hodges, Holcombe, Holliday, Holmes, Hood, Hopkins, Hopton, Hosford, Hotchkiss, Hough, Howard, Hubard, Hull, Hummer, Hunt, Hunter, Huntington, Hurlbut, Hutchison, Hyde, Ingraham, Ince, Ingram, Irving, Isham, James, Jenkins, Jewett, Johnson, Joiner, Joliffe, Jones, Keim, Kellogg, Kelton, Kenney, Kennon, Keppel, Keyser, Kidd, Kimball, King, Kingman, Kingsbury, Kingsley, Kurtz, Lascelles, Ladd, Langworthy, Larrabee, Latham, Lea, Leake, Leonard, Lewandowski, Lewis, Lightfoot, Lightner, Lincoln, Logan, Lott, Lovell, Lowndes, Lucas, Lukens, Lumbert, Lumley, Mackworth, Madison, Main, Mallory, Manley, Mann, Manners, Manwaring, Marbury, Marshall, Martin, Mason, Maury, Maxson, McCampbell, McDonnell, McGuire, McIlhenney, McMullin, McPherson, Mead, Meade, Meadows, Meriwether, Merritt, Miller, Mills, Milner, Miner, Minor, Mitchell, Moncure, Montague, Moore, Moran, Morris, Morton, Muir, Mullikin, Mumford, Munroe, Murray, Nelson, Nicklin, Nourse, Noyes, Nye, Ogle, Olivier, Osborne, Otis, Oviatt, Owen, Packer, Packett, Page, Paine, Palmer, Parks, Parlin, Patrick, Patten, Patterson, Patteson, Patton, Payne, Peabody, Pearce, Peck, Peckham, Pendleton, Perine, Perkins, Perry, Peterson, Peyton, Phelps, Phillips, Pierce, Pillow, Place, Poindexter, Pomeroy, Porter, Prentice, Preston, Price, Putnam, Quarles, Randall, Randolph, Rathbone, Raymond, Reade, Reed, Reilly, Reynolds, Rhodes, Rice, Richards, Richardson, Richmond, Ridgway, Ripley, Rives, Robertson, Robins, Robinson, Robson, Robson, Rogers, Roman, Romney, Root, Roper, Ross, Rowley, Royster, Russell, Ryan, Sale, Saltonstall, Sampson, Sandys, Satterlee, Scarborough, Schlesinger, Schroeder, Scott, Scruggs, Scudder, Sedgwick, Selden, Shackmaple, Shattuck, Sheldon, Shepard, Shrewsbury, Simpson, Sinclair, Singleton, Slaughter, Sloan, Smith, Snicker, Sorley, Spencer, Spilman, Spotswood, Stanton, Starling, Stearns, Stebbins, Steele, Stevenson, Stokes, Stone, Stringer, Strode, Sullivan, Sumner, Swan, Swartwout, Sykes, Tabb, Taintor, Talboys, Taliaferro, Tallmadge, Tasker, Tayloe, Taylor, Tennison, Terry, Thiot, Thomas, Thompson, Thomson,  Thornton, Throckmorton, Thurber, Tiernan, Tiffany, Tilley, Todd, Topping, Tracy, Trumbull, Truscott, Tucker, Tunstall, Turner, Tyndell, Underwood, Van Zandt, Venable, Villiers, Von Dohlen, Walker, Wallop, Walton, Walworth, Ward, Warfield, Warner, Washburn, Washington, Waterhouse, Wattles, Watson, Weaver, Webster, Weeks, Wertenbaker, West, Wheeler, Wheaton, Whipple, White, Whitner, Whitney, Wickham, Wigglesworth, Wightman, Wiley, Williams, Willis, Willoughby, Wilson, Windsor, Wingfield, Wood, Woodbridge, Woodford, Woods, Woodville, Woolfolk, Wordsworth, Worthington, Wyndham, Yeomans, York, and Young.

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Filed under Ancestors, Ancestral History, Ancestry, Cousins, Family Forest National Treasure, Family Forest® Project, Family History, Genealogy, Hollywood, Kate Middleton, Prince William, Royalty

Warrior Genes

Here’s a Veterans’ Day question. What do the most decorated U.S. soldier in World War I and the most decorated U.S. soldier in World War II have in common?

One answer appears to be warrior genes.

According to the recorded history mapped out and networked in the Family Forest®, and summarized in this computer-generated Family Forest® relationship chart, both Sergeant Alvin York and Audie Murphy are descended from Sir Henry “Hotspur” Percy.

According to his Wikipedia profile, Sir Henry Percy “early acquired a great reputation as a warrior.”

Who would have been more surprised? Would it have been Sir Henry Percy to learn that two of his descendants each also acquired a great reputation as a warrior? Or would it have been Sergeant York and Audie Murphy to discover they both shared the same famous warrior ancestor?

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Filed under Ancestral History, Audie Murphy, Family Forest, Family Forest® Project, Family Genes, Genealogy, Sergeant Alvin York, Sir Henry Percy, Veterans Day, World War II

An Important Message and Lesson

I just read a short preface in a book that was written more than a century ago. If you have any interest in discovering more of your ancestors, it is valuable for you to read it.

It illuminates how some of our ancestors were thinking long before we were born, and more importanly, it reveals a secret that genealogy big business does not want you to know.

In 1894 Guy Scoby Rix began a valuable 20-year genealogy research project that includes parts of the ancestry of probably more than one million living people. From Concord, NH in 1905, he wrote the preface to his work. It reveals his character, his intentions, and his commitment to accuracy.

Over the centuries there have been thousands of people like Mr. Rix who have published similar works on different families. Isn’t it much smarter to find out what knowledge is contained in those works, before spending tedious efforts sifting through raw unfiltered data?

The next time someone suggests that the first place for you to begin searching for your ancestors is in the raw data that hundreds or thousands of oftentimes very qualified people have been combing through for decades if not centuries, ask them, why?

Isn’t it best to find out first what the experts have already discovered? Why use any of your valuable research time to search for what’s already been found?

Naturally, I strongly recommend that the best starting point for ancestral history is our high quality tour guide service (the primary Family Forest® or some of it’s  hundreds of secondary publications.

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Filed under Ancestral History, Family, Family Forest National Treasure, Family Forest® Project, Genealogy