Category Archives: education

The Other Boleyn Girl

The Other Boleyn Girl is an ancestral history movie just premiering this weekend. It focuses on Lady Mary Boleyn, the elder sister of Queen Anne Boleyn, and the aunt of Queen Elizabeth I.

 

The trailer looked compelling, and I followed up by checking the Family Forest® to see what we have already on Lady Mary Boleyn.

 

She had at least two children, and they are recorded in history as having the surname of Lady Mary’s husband, William Carey, Esq. Some historians disagree about their paternity, and claim their actual father is King Henry VIII. If so, their descendants are the only known descendants of Henry VIII.

A 20-generation descendant view of Lady Mary Boleyn in the Family Forest®shows many of her descendants with common surnames, and they include a sizable number of people who are also descendants of Princess Pocahontas.

Lady Mary also has a number of famous descendants, including John D. Rockefeller, Sr., Prince William and Prince Harry, Hollywood actor Cary Elwes, Sarah Ferguson, Winston Churchill, Charles Darwin, Anne Spencer (Morrow) Lindbergh, Governor Howard Dean, Rep. Mac Thornberry and Internet founder Tim Berners-Lee.

 

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George Washington’s Lower Part and Presidential Trivia

There is a great wealth of fascinating and enriching tidbits and historical trivia that has been squirreled away in old books over the centuries, and we have been digitally indexing as much of it as possible into the Family Forest®, to make those nuggets easy to discover. We thought it might be fun to point out a few of them for President’s Day.

 

For instance, most people probably do not know that our first commander-in-chief,

President George Washington had a body double. For the rest of the story see

George Washington’s Lower Part.

 

Do you know that many of the United States Presidents have Hollywood Connections?

 

Do you know that your ancestors may also be Presidential ancestors?

 

Do you know that President Bush and Senator John Kerry are related?

 

Do you know why Hugh Hefner invited both Bush and Kerry to his Playboy mansion in 2004?

 

Do you know that when Prince Charles visited the White House in 2005 he was actually visiting his cousin?

 

Do you know why NPR did a story about FamilyForest.com, Barack Obama, Walt Disney, Brooke Shields, Humphrey Bogart, and President Bush?

 

If you follow these links, the next time someone asks “Do you know ……

 

Happy President’s Day!

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Filed under Ancestral History, education, Family, Family Genes, Family Trees, FamilyForest, Genealogy, history, internet, politics, Uncategorized

The Point of No Return

On this day in history 234 years ago an event occurred which impacted the life of everyone alive today.

 

boston-tea-party.gif

 

The Boston Tea Party has been called the “point of no return” for the birth of democracy. The chain of events which was started by this act of civil disobedience on December 16, 1773 changed the future for the people in every nation on Earth today. This dramatic evening event has long been a target area in the growth of the Family Forest®.

 

There is a great site I recommend for learning about the Boston Tea Party itself. Then for a People-Centered Approach to History®, I recommend the best digital central source for generation-by-generation family ties leading to and from the Boston Tea Party, the Family Forest® New World Edition.

 

For instance, one of the participants married two of the daughters of Paul Revere, another one of the participants. You can follow their lines of descent to various families, including the Rockefellers.

 

Many Boston Tea Party descendants are scattered throughout the country today. Wouldn’t it be a great story to tell your grandchildren, if it turns out that you are one of them?

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A Red Letter Day

Whenever I experience a remarkable day in the Family Forest® similar to the one I just had, I call it a red letter day.

 

A Family Forest® red letter day is defined as a day when changes of extraordinary and enormous impact happen. These are changes that are vast and far reaching, changes that personally relate to at least tens if not hundreds of millions of living people, and changes that by themselves would justify a new release of the Family Forest®.

 

There is an ancestress in the Family Forest® New World Edition named Eleanor who was born in about 1405. By reasonable estimates more than 100,000,000 living people can call Eleanor grandmother, preceded by a number of “greats.”

 

Eleanor is lineage-linked to both parents, but her father is not lineage-linked to his parents. Eleanor’s mother however is extremely lineage-linked. A 40-generation Family Forest® ancestor chart for her fills in over 1.5 million boxes with the names of ancestors who Eleanor would call grandmother or grandfather, preceded by a number of “greats.”

 

But Eleanor’s father was entered twice in the Family Forest® New World Edition, once as a child of his parents, and once as the husband of Eleanor’s mother. Having just found the recorded history which identifies the two entries as the same person, a simple merge of the previously two individuals produced an enormous gain in the number of identified ancestors of Eleanor’s 100,000,000 or more living descendants.

 

Eleanor’s father’s 40-generation Family Forest® ancestor chart fills in over 560,000 additional boxes with the names of ancestors who Eleanor (and of course all of her descendants) would call grandmother or grandfather, preceded by a number of “greats.”

 

This is one more dramatic example of how less can be more, much more.

 

For me red letter days are always exciting, and still awesome, although they now happen quite frequently.

 

In the early years of the Family Forest® Project, while building the foundation and framework, they almost never happened. But during the last few years the connections have been happening at a surprising and accelerating rate, and there have been between one and two hundred true red letter days during the more than seven hundred days since the Family Forest® New World Edition was finalized.

  

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What is an Ancestral History Cartographer?

 Cartographer: one who produces maps.

When ancient mariners returned from their voyages of discovery, they turned their records and logs over to monastic type individuals (map makers, cartographers) who would turn that data into maps which other mariners would use on subsequent journeys to the same regions.

When those mariners returned, they turned their new records and logs over to same monastic type individuals who would then use the new data to make corrections and improvements to those maps, and then produce new maps that other mariners would use on subsequent journeys to the same regions.

That’s similar to what I have been doing digitally with a vast wealth of professionally recorded history for over a decade.

Over the centuries many have journeyed to ancestral regions and brought back their findings. I am comparing and distilling those findings, digitally connecting the dots of recorded history according to where the experts say they should be connected, and producing new maps of generation-by-generation ancestral pathways that zigzag through thousands of years of recorded history through the lives of actual people.

Most of these maps have never been seen before, and visually following one’s curiosity through the world’s largest maps of human genetic migration can be truly fascinating and enriching.

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What is an Ancestral History Tour Guide?

 

By dictionary definition, I am a genealogist. In reality, I am not what one usually expects a genealogist to be. 

 

By analogy, think of true genealogists as master chefs. Highly trained professional experts who start from scratch and create precision works.

 

Think of an ancestral history tour guide as similar to a person who reviews fine dining restaurants for guides such as Fodors, Frommers, or newspapers such as the New York Times, and directs readers to the best of the best to save them time, money, and aggravation.

That’s what I am doing, and have been doing for tens of thousands of hours already, with many hundreds of warehouses of professionally recorded history. I explore through the fine print of a vast wealth of ancestral history details that the experts have discovered and recorded over the centuries, and I leave a well-marked digital trail to the exact locations of just the best of the best.

 

This allows you and other Family Forest® explorers to quickly zoom into the most relevant ancestral history knowledge, the best of the best, without wading through hundreds or thousands of repetitions of information and misinformation (as is often necessary on the Internet).

 

This is the way I wanted to find my ancestry presented when I became curious; distilled to the best of the best of what the experts had already discovered.

 

Actually, isn’t this the way you hope to explore any topic which interests you?

 

Wouldn’t you rather start any research quest by first finding out what a reasonably intelligent person has discovered after filtering though all of the repetitions and misinformation while searching for the best of the best?

 

 

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So What, Who Cares?

Everyone would, if they only knew. And we would like to give them this special experience via the
Family Forest® Project
.

 

A couple of recent comments suggest that the distant past is irrelevant and there is no good reason for knowing who one’s early ancestors were.

 

These opinions can only be held by someone who has not yet seen any of their own ancestors portrayed in a Hollywood movie or someone who has never stood transfixed in a museum gazing at an ancestor captured on canvas at a pivotal moment in history.

 

Paraphrasing Thomas Aquinas, to him who has not yet experienced it, no explanation is possible. To him who has experienced it, no explanation is necessary.

Try to find these “Ah Ha!” experiences for yourself, and for your family. You and your family will be delighted you did.

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