Tag Archives: Notability

Wikipedia Attacks Knowledge

A generally anonymous user at Wikipedia instigated a deletion of the Family Forest® page which had been up since January of 2007 at Wikipedia, and it feels like a malicious attack. So why now and what was the motivation?

What was the real agenda of this person? It appears that he or she doesn’t know what the Family Forest® is, but was sure that it doesn’t deserve recognition. Or could he or she have known what the Family Forest® is, and was carrying out sabotage orders?

Allegedly the Family Forest® fails Wikipedia’s Notability test.  Doesn’t it seem that a system of digital links which can generate tens of billions of pages of high quality ancestral history charts, ebooks, and reports should be considered notable, and a system of digital links which can map out a larger portion of the early ancestral pathways than they can see anywhere else for at least one out of three people on the planet should be considered notable?

In the deletion discussion (which I did not know was going on at the time) I was dismissed as just a genealogy hobbyist. On a typical day now, I can substantially improve the assembled ancestry of tens of millions of living people. This is possible only with the proprietary digital resource (the Family Forest®) I have spent tens of thousands of hours developing.

Someone who has spent 40 to 80 hours per week almost every week for 16 years digitally indexing human history in lineage-linked format should not be dismissed as just a hobbyist.

One of our investors recommends legal counsel (and possible action) to find out if this anonymous, mean-spirited, and unfounded attack, and Wikipedia’s decision to delete the entry without bothering to make any notification to either the individual who wrote and updated annually the entry on the Family Forest®, nor to the company, which is easily contacted from the FamilyForest.com website, is actionable in a court of law as it is quite damaging to the company, scurrilous, and possibly backed by some would be competitor seeking a corporate advantage.

We don’t want to do that. We don’t want to counterattack. There’s a lot I like about Wikipedia, and I have trouble believing that most of the people behind Wikipedia would sanction the wrong that was done to us.

So here is an offer I presented to Wikimedia last week for a win-win solution. If they will reexamine the Family Forest deletion decision, for the next 120 days they can make the following available at Wikipedia.

Every person who contributes $25 to Wikipedia will receive a complimentary $49 download of the 10,142 page Family Forest® Descendants of King Edward III of England eBook.

Exploring this one huge eBook should convince almost anyone that this one title by itself is notable. Since it is like but one grain of sand on the beach compared to all of the titles the Family Forest® can generate, it should be obvious that the Family Forest® should easily pass Wikipedia’s Notability test.

We are still waiting for Wikimedia to respond to our offer. If they have not accepted by the end of this week, we will offer it to the American Red Cross instead.

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Filed under American Red Cross, Ancestral History, Ancestry, ebooks, Family Forest, Family Forest® Project, Family History, FamilyForest.com, Genealogy, King Edward III of England, Notability, Wikimedia, Wikipedia