Category Archives: Ancestors

Assessing Potential Ancestors

According to Bishop Stapeldon of Exeter who was sent to inspect her, “The lady … has not uncomely hair, betwixt blue-black and brown. Her head is clean shaped; her forhead high and broad, and standing somewhat forward. Her face narrows between the eyes, and the lower part of her face is still more narrow and slender than her forhead. Her eyes are blackish-brown and deep. Her nose is fairly smooth and even, save that it is somewhat broad at the tip and flattened, yet it is no snub-nose. Her nostrils are also broad, her mouth fairly wide. Her lips somewhat full, and especially the lower lip. Her teeth which have fallen and grown again are white enough, but the rest are not so white. The lower teeth project a little beyond the upper; yet this is but little seen. Her ears and chin are comely enough. Her neck, shoulders, and all her body and lower limbs are reasonably well shapen; all her limbs are well set and unmaimed; and none is amiss so far as a man may see. Moreover, she is of brown skin all over, and much like her father; and in all things she is pleasant enough, as it seems to us.”

The Bishop also added she was neither too tall nor too short for her age, and that she was of fair carriage, and well taught in all that becometh her rank.

Philippa of Hainault was eight years old at the time of her assessment. She lived to become Queen of England and the ancestor of certainly hundreds of millions of people living today, including last year’s Oscar winner and this year’s Oscar nominee, Jeff Bridges, the focal point of the next blog.

The central framework of Philippa’s lines of descent to present day can be found in this eBook.

Anyone with a Family Forest® National Treasure Edition can easily pull up various size ancestor charts for Philippa, including a 10-generation chart with 838 boxes filled in, and a 60-generation chart with 764,590 boxes filled in.

This is one illustration of why we believe at least two billion living people have more of their early ancestry already assembled in the Family Forest® than they can see anywhere else.

P. S. The Bishop’s assessment can be found on page 81 of Debrett’s Kings and Queens of Britain by David Williamson.

See a short video about her descendants

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Filed under Ancestors, Ancestry, Debrett's Kings and Queens of Britain, Family Forest National Treasure, Family Genes, Family History, Genealogy, Jeff Bridges, King Edward III of England, National Treasure, Oscar nominee, Philippa, Queen of England

A Christmas Story to The White House

In real life, the actor who played little Ralphie, the central character of A Christmas Story  has family ties to The White House, according to the vast network of ancestral pathways mapped out in the Family Forest®.

Through their Crabtree ancestors, Peter Billingsley and President Obama are ninth cousins.

Also through this same line, President Obama is also a cousin of Glenn Billingsley. Glenn’s wife Barbara is best known as June Cleaver, Oprah’s childhood television heroine and Wally and Beaver’s mother on Leave It To Beaver.

Thus the First Family has family ties to not only one of the most popular Christmas movies of the last two decades, but also to one of the most popular TV families of the twentieth century.

Among other objectives, the Family Forest® Project is Networking Family History with Hollywood™. Find your family’s connection to Hollywood in the Family Forest® National Treasure Edition.

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Filed under A Christmas Story, Ancestors, Family, Family Forest National Treasure, Genealogy, Hollywood, IMDb, Oprah, Peter Billingsley, White House

Kate Middleton’s Other Famous Relatives

An Associated Press news story Tuesday reported on some of Kate Middleton’s famous relatives. All of the connections they announced, plus many more networked connections, could have been explored visually a year ago in the Family Forest® National Treasure Edition.

The Family Forest® Project is, among a number of other objectives, Networking Family History with Hollywood™. If we explore the descendants of Kate’s Fairfax ancestors who were mentioned in the AP article, we find some interesting entertainment and celebrity cousins of Kate.

She has several cousins associated with comedy, such as talk show host Ellen DeGeneres, Alec Baldwin who portrayed his 14C2R last week on The Mark Twain Prize for American Humor, and Cheers star Ted Danson.

Other Fairfax cousins are AOL founder Steve Case, incoming Wyoming Governor Matt Mead, and 2010 World Series ­­­participants President George Herbert Walker Bush and President George Walker Bush.

If we widen the net just a little further by backing up one more generation to Sir William Gascoigne, also mentioned in the AP article, we find more of Kate’s entertainment and celebrity cousins. They include Anthony Perkins, Cary Elwes, Christopher Reeve, Grace Slick, Hilary Duff, Montgomery Clift, Paul Giamatti, Sarah Ferguson, Mitt Romney, and U.S. Presidents Taft and Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Family Forest® Ancestors-at-a-glance(TM) charts for most of the above mentioned cousins of future queen Kate Middleton can be found here. And for more thought-provoking edutainment, you can visually explore Kate’s and Prince William’s generation-by-generation ancestral pathways leading to many of human history’s most famous ancestors in the Family Forest® National Treasure Edition.

Everyday folks (See FAQ #4), like me, make up most of Kate’s hundreds of thousands of relatives she is already networked to in the Family Forest®. Maybe you or one of your ancestors are one of them?

Just Kate’s known Gascoigne cousins (all royally descended) have surnames including Abbott, Aborn, Adams, Alexander, Allen, Allyn, Ambler, Ames, Anderson, Armistead, Armstrong, Arnold, Asbury, Atkinson, Atteberry, Auchincloss, Austin, Avery, Babbitt, Babcock, Bacon, Bailey, Baker, Baldwin, Ball, Bankhead, Baptist, Barbour, Barker, Barksdale, Barney, Barrett, Bartlett, Barton, Bassett, Beasley, Beauchamp, Bedinger, Beebe, Bellingham, Benning, Benson, Bethell, Bigelow, Billingsley, Bingham, Black, Bladen, Block, Blodgett, Bohannan, Bolton, Bonfils, Booker, Bosworth, Bowen, Bradley, Brattle, Breed, Brewster, Briggs, Brill, Brockway, Brown, Browne, Browning, Bruce, Bryan, Buck, Buckner, Bulkley, Bullock, Burlingame, Burr, Burrows, Burrus, Burwell, Bush, Butler, Button, Byars, Brydges, Byrd, Brydon, Byrne, Cabell, Caldwell, Calhoun, Callaway, Carpenter, Carrier, Carrington, Carter, Cavendish, Chamberlayne, Champlin, Chapman, Chesebro, Chesebrough, Chesley, Christophers, Churchill, Clark, Clarkson, Cobb, Cobbs, Cochran, Cocke, Coit, Colburn, Coleman, Coles, Colfax, Comstock, Cone, Converse, Cooch, Cooke, Cookson, Costello, Cotton, Cox, Crabtree, Crackenthorpe, Crisman, Crocker, Crosby, Cushman, Daingerfield, Dale, Dallas, Daniel, Davidson, Davies, Davis, Day, Dean, Dearborn, Denison, Denniston, Dewey, Dickinson, Dietz, Dillard, Dimmock, Dixon, Dodge, Dougherty, Dowsling, Drake, Duff, Dulany, Durfee, Early, Edmondson, Edrington, Egerton, Eldredge, Ellis, Elwes, Empie, Erickson, Fain, Fairfax, Farwell, Fenwick, Ferguson, Fernsley, Fish, Fisher, Fiske, Fitzhugh, Foote, Foraker, Forbes, Forrest, Foster, Fowler, Franklin, Freeman, Frost, Fry, Fuller, Furlow, Gallup, Gammons, Gardner, Garnsey, Garth, Gates, Gatewood, Geer, Giddings, Gillespie, Glassell, Glenn, Goddard, Goff, Goggin, Good, Gordon, Gore, Gorsuch, Grafton, Grant, Green, Greene, Greenhow, Griffith, Griffin, Guernsey, Guest, Guile, Gwathmey, Hale, Hall, Hallam, Hamilton, Hancock, Harlow, Harris, Harrison, Hazard, Helm, Henderson, Henley, Henry, Herbert, Hereford, Herman, Herrick, Hill, Hinckley, Hoag, Hodges, Holcombe, Holliday, Holmes, Hood, Hopkins, Hopton, Hosford, Hotchkiss, Hough, Howard, Hubard, Hull, Hummer, Hunt, Hunter, Huntington, Hurlbut, Hutchison, Hyde, Ingraham, Ince, Ingram, Irving, Isham, James, Jenkins, Jewett, Johnson, Joiner, Joliffe, Jones, Keim, Kellogg, Kelton, Kenney, Kennon, Keppel, Keyser, Kidd, Kimball, King, Kingman, Kingsbury, Kingsley, Kurtz, Lascelles, Ladd, Langworthy, Larrabee, Latham, Lea, Leake, Leonard, Lewandowski, Lewis, Lightfoot, Lightner, Lincoln, Logan, Lott, Lovell, Lowndes, Lucas, Lukens, Lumbert, Lumley, Mackworth, Madison, Main, Mallory, Manley, Mann, Manners, Manwaring, Marbury, Marshall, Martin, Mason, Maury, Maxson, McCampbell, McDonnell, McGuire, McIlhenney, McMullin, McPherson, Mead, Meade, Meadows, Meriwether, Merritt, Miller, Mills, Milner, Miner, Minor, Mitchell, Moncure, Montague, Moore, Moran, Morris, Morton, Muir, Mullikin, Mumford, Munroe, Murray, Nelson, Nicklin, Nourse, Noyes, Nye, Ogle, Olivier, Osborne, Otis, Oviatt, Owen, Packer, Packett, Page, Paine, Palmer, Parks, Parlin, Patrick, Patten, Patterson, Patteson, Patton, Payne, Peabody, Pearce, Peck, Peckham, Pendleton, Perine, Perkins, Perry, Peterson, Peyton, Phelps, Phillips, Pierce, Pillow, Place, Poindexter, Pomeroy, Porter, Prentice, Preston, Price, Putnam, Quarles, Randall, Randolph, Rathbone, Raymond, Reade, Reed, Reilly, Reynolds, Rhodes, Rice, Richards, Richardson, Richmond, Ridgway, Ripley, Rives, Robertson, Robins, Robinson, Robson, Robson, Rogers, Roman, Romney, Root, Roper, Ross, Rowley, Royster, Russell, Ryan, Sale, Saltonstall, Sampson, Sandys, Satterlee, Scarborough, Schlesinger, Schroeder, Scott, Scruggs, Scudder, Sedgwick, Selden, Shackmaple, Shattuck, Sheldon, Shepard, Shrewsbury, Simpson, Sinclair, Singleton, Slaughter, Sloan, Smith, Snicker, Sorley, Spencer, Spilman, Spotswood, Stanton, Starling, Stearns, Stebbins, Steele, Stevenson, Stokes, Stone, Stringer, Strode, Sullivan, Sumner, Swan, Swartwout, Sykes, Tabb, Taintor, Talboys, Taliaferro, Tallmadge, Tasker, Tayloe, Taylor, Tennison, Terry, Thiot, Thomas, Thompson, Thomson,  Thornton, Throckmorton, Thurber, Tiernan, Tiffany, Tilley, Todd, Topping, Tracy, Trumbull, Truscott, Tucker, Tunstall, Turner, Tyndell, Underwood, Van Zandt, Venable, Villiers, Von Dohlen, Walker, Wallop, Walton, Walworth, Ward, Warfield, Warner, Washburn, Washington, Waterhouse, Wattles, Watson, Weaver, Webster, Weeks, Wertenbaker, West, Wheeler, Wheaton, Whipple, White, Whitner, Whitney, Wickham, Wigglesworth, Wightman, Wiley, Williams, Willis, Willoughby, Wilson, Windsor, Wingfield, Wood, Woodbridge, Woodford, Woods, Woodville, Woolfolk, Wordsworth, Worthington, Wyndham, Yeomans, York, and Young.

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Filed under Ancestors, Ancestral History, Ancestry, Cousins, Family Forest National Treasure, Family Forest® Project, Family History, Genealogy, Hollywood, Kate Middleton, Prince William, Royalty

Before there was a U.S.S. Spangler

We recently learned of the U.S.S. Spangler reunion which will be starting on Monday October 25, 2010 in San Antonio, TX.

Prompted by a great visit from Kristine’s cousin Jeannie, both nieces of the Purple Heart recipient the ship was named for, we began reading through a large stack of Uncle Donald’s letters and clippings that were still in the possession of his only living sibling and my outstanding father-in-law, nonagenarian Robert Kent Spangler.

Amid the sorrow of losing so much promise so early, what fun it was! New discoveries led to other new discoveries.

For instance, we found a letter written on the Fourth of July 1943 to Mr. and Mrs. Martin and Myrtle Elizabeth (Blue) Spangler (Donald’s mother, Mrs. Spangler christened the U.S.S. Spangler).

It was from Miss Velma V. Vogelman of Baltimore, MD who knew Donald from his Naval Academy days. She had just learned of his death through LIFE magazine, and she was writing on the anniversary of a significant day.

“On July 4, 1940 he came to Baltimore and spent the day with me and my parents. This day I shall always remember as one of the happiest in my life. He spoke often of his home and parents and how he would have enjoyed spending that particular day with you in Albion, Ind.”

We had never heard of a mention of Uncle Donald in LIFE. So we used Google Books and quickly found it in print in the July 5, 1943 issue on page 21.

We’re looking forward to following up on other discoveries from the letters and clippings. What other interesting insights to history are waiting to be found?

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Filed under Ancestors, Ancestral History, Cousins, Family Forest National Treasure, Family Forest® Project, Fourth of July, Genealogy, history, Independence Day, Reunion, Uncategorized, USS Spangler, Veterans Day, Women's History Month, World War II

Texas Heroes and Google Books

I’d like to share a fascinating ancestral history gem I discovered at Google Books this week. 

It involves early Texas heroes, and the essence of it has now been digitally lineage-linked in the Family Forest® to a more recent national hero from Texas. Literally millions of people, including probably you (I know I am one of them), relate to this story through their own family ties. 

Audie Murphy was a national hero from Texas, the most decorated American soldier in World War II. His biography, No Name on the Bullet, mentions that his family tree included such men as one of his great-grandfathers, John Berry, but gives no identifying details about John Berry or what he did. So I turned to Google Books in search of answers.

I found more than I was hoping for. It was hidden in a book from 1900 by A. W. Sowell titled Early Settlers and Indian Fighters of Southwest Texas. 

Within a six-page section about John Berry’s wife (titled Mrs. Hannah Berry) are details about who he was, what he did, and in particular the noteworthy service he performed for Davy Crockett shortly before the Alamo. But it was a statement about his wife, also an ancestor of Audie Murphy, which caught my attention. 

While she was still alive, Grandma Berry is said to have had “seventy-four grandchildren that she knows of, and one hundred and twenty-four great-grandchildren, and two great-great-grandchildren.” 

We now know what the author A. W. Sowell could not know; a half century later, Grandma Berry would become an ancestor of at least one Hollywood actor, the most decorated American soldier in World War II. 

How many thousands (tens of thousands?) of living descendants might Grandma Berry have now, a full century after she finished her historically eventful and productive life in Texas at the age of 91? How many of her descendants do not yet know of their own family ties to her, the Alamo, and Audie Murphy?

The National Treasure Hunt begins in Texas. See for yourself.

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Filed under A People-Centered Approach To History®, Ancestors, Ancestral History, Ancestry, Audie Murphy, Family Forest National Treasure, Family Forest® Project, Family Trees, Genealogy, Google, history, Hollywood, National Treasure, Texas, World War II

Chelsea Clinton Family Forest Kinship

Being curious about Chelsea’s big wedding event this weekend, we wondered how many of her Family Forest relatives might be attending. So we ran a Family Forest kinship report to see who she is known to be related to so far, and we posted the celebrity-studded report at our website.

No surprise that the results include one US President and one US Senator, but the report also contains another US Senator, a US Secretary of the Treasury, a Canadian Prime Minister, and one member of the British Royal Family.

In addition there are one famous author, one famous economist, the Dionne quintuplets, two Grammy-winning singing stars and two other equally well-known performers, and a number of other Hollywood celebrities including two famous directors, one of the most famous Hollywood actresses today, three Oscar-winning actors, and a couple of other equally well-known actors.

We’re waiting to see how many of them attend the event at Astor Courts.

Best wishes to Chelsea on her special day.

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Filed under Ancestors, Ancestral History, Ancestry, Astor Courts, Chelsea Clinton, Family Forest, Genealogy, Hollywood, Uncategorized, wedding, White House

Independence Day 2010

The Fourth of July always triggers many fun memories from childhood and later years that I cherish.

Yet I can’t help but wonder how much better those memories might have been, and how much more I would have paid attention in school, if it hadn’t taken more than 40 years to discover that I am personally connected through generation-by-generation family ties to the original Fourth of July and the struggle for American independence.

My wish is that our future leaders experience this enriching discovery while they are still in school, that this knowledge is given to them early enough in their life to make a meaningful impact in their lives and the lives of their families.

That is why the American Revolution has continued to be one of the top five focus areas of Family Forest® growth during the last 15 years.

It is also why we say that the Family Forest® National Treasure Edition can connect more people through family ties to more of the people, places, and events in American history than any other digital resource, either online or offline.

Happy Fourth of July!

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Filed under American Revolution, Ancestors, Ancestry, Family Forest National Treasure, Fourth of July, Genealogy, Independence Day