Tag Archives: Family Forest

Your Relationship to Downton Abbey

How surprised would you be to discover that you have actual family ties to Downton Abbey?

Could having that knowledge increase your enjoyment of the show?

For a limited time, this is your chance to have the Family Forest® give you and your family the opportunity to actually see that surprising discovery.

Downton Abbey is set at Highclere Castle. The present owner of Highclere Castle, the 8th Earl of Carnarvon, is very extensively networked through sourced family ties in the Family Forest® to a large number of American and Old World families.

Some of his ancestral surnames in the Family Forest® include Alden, Allerton, Andrews, Armistead, Barrett, Barrow, Bartlett, Benning, Bickford, Bicknell, Brown, Carter, Cass, Chandler, Chew, Clark, Cogswell, Cooke, Cooper, Courtney, Crane, Cushman, Dane, Davis, Denison, Dudley, Dutch, Dyer, Eaton, Elwell, Fendall, Flint, Flynt, Fogg, Fox, Frost, Gardner, Gardiner, Gatewood, Gibbons, Goodrich, Gookin, Gorman, Greene, Hallet, Harlow, Hatch, Hawke, Heard, Herbert, Hill, Hoar, Howard, Hudson, Humphrey, Hunt, Hutchins, Jenney, Jones, Kay, Kimball, Kinsman, Knapp, Lee, Leighton, Lightfoot, Long, Mitchell, Molyneux, Moore, Morehead, Moulton, Norman, Nutter, Odiorne, Page, Pemberton, Philbrick, Phillips, Poor, Poore, Pope, Porter, Pratt, Presley, Quincy, Richardson, Rindge, Roberts, Rogers, Roper, Salter, Sanborn, Sawyer, Shaw, Sherburne, Simonton, Slaughter, Small, Smith, Stetson, Thompson, Tomson, Turner, Tuttle, Underwood, Walker, Warner, Wendell, Wentworth, White, Willett, and Wise.

It is very likely that Family Forest® can generate a chart linking you through generation-by-generation family ties to the 8th Earl of Carnarvon. This chart will be similar to the attached samples for Tom Hank’s son, Kim Kardasian’s daughter, Prince William’s son, Ellen DeGeneres, and Anderson Cooper.

What do we need to provide you and your family with this amazing service?

Accurate knowledge about your recent ancestry. Simply provide us with a copy of your approved membership application to a respected hereditary society, like the DAR, SAR, SMD, DRT, etc.

What does it cost to receive this amazing service?

Just $29. 

How likely is it that the Family Forest® can actually connect you and your family through actual family ties to Downton Abbey?

We are certain enough of success that in the event that we cannot, we will give you a $100 credit for Family Forest® eBooks.

How accurate is the knowledge presented by the Family Forest®?

Click here for answer at question #11.

Leading you to discoveries about your personal connections to history and present day edutainment is what the Family Forest® is designed for.

Millisecond Publishing Company, Inc.

Home of the Family Forest® Project

http://www.familyforest.com

A People-Centered Approach To History®

https://familyforest.wordpress.com

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Filed under 8th Earl of Carnarvon, Ancestral History, Downton Abbey, Family Forest, Family Forest® Project, Genealogy, Highclere Castle

Theoretical Versus Actual

A very bright anthropology student from Michigan, with a personal interest in mathematics, statistics and probability theory, asked for my opinion on some of his interesting thoughts about where we all came from. Here is my reply.

I wish I had your knowledge of, and skills with, numbers so I could respond more intelligently to your thoughts and questions. Following are some of my thoughts based on what I’ve read, and what I see daily as I visually travel back and forth through the most extremely interconnected web of thousands of years of ancestral history (the Family Forest®), based on recorded history.

I believe that the theoretical estimate that an average person in 1500 has about 1.5 million offspring alive today is too low. Here’s why.

The Family Forest® is based on what actually did happen, according to recorded history, and not on what might happen, theoretically. Here are a few examples of what can happen in just one century.

Martha (Clarke) Willard (b. 1694, d. 1794) was said to have had 12 children, 90 grandchildren, 206 great-grandchildren, and 45 great-great-grandchildren when she died at the age of 100.

Catharine (Andrews) Shattuck (b. 2/16/1753 Ipswich, MA, d. 11/19/1845 Temple, NH) was said to have had 150 living descendants when she died, seven children, 51 grandchildren, 90 great-grandchildren, and two great-great-grandchildren when she died.

Esek Brown (b. 3/8/1678/9 Newport, RI, d. 12/4/1772 Swansea, MA) was said to have been survived by 11 children, 112 grandchildren, and 129 great-grandchildren.

As is explained in the third-from-the-bottom paragraph at http://www.familyforest.com/captainslog/36.html, from Mayflower Society estimates 1.5 million offspring appears more reasonable from 1600.

In addition, I believed I read that one of the foremost living genealogists, Gary Boyd Roberts, estimated that prominent Colonial ancestor Governor Thomas Dudley may have 10 million descendants.

So couple the three actual one-century examples from above with the 1600 estimates, and it seems that a reasonable estimate from a 1500 person is tens of millions of living descendants.

It would be difficult to factor in the overlap that would need to be subtracted, but certainly the number should be very large.

Considering how many boxes each of us would need to fill in to truly know a substantial part of our deep ancestry (http://familyforest.com/resources/51/ancestors-at-a-glance), it may seem reasonable to assume that going back 400-500 years ago, we most certainly had at least one Japanese or Chinese ancestor.

Visually exploring so many generation-by-generation ancestral pathways zig-zagging geographically over the millennia in the Family Forest®, according to recorded history, leads me to the following opinions.

My odds of having at least one Japanese or Chinese ancestor in the last 500 years is in the range of slim to none. During the last 1,000 years, the odds becomes quite possible. During the last 2,000 years, I believe it is almost certain.

I also believe that the reverse is true about Japanese or Chinese descendants having some European ancestors.

Hopefully this helps. Please stay tuned here for a free Family Forest® give-a-way that will be available in a couple of days. It will help illustrate genetic migration over centuries.

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Filed under Ancestors, Ancestral History, Ancestry, Descendants, Family Forest, Family Forest® Project, Genealogy, Genetic migration, mathematics

Largest Ancestral History eBook Coming Soon

Largest Ancestral History eBook Coming Soon

Wouldn’t it be cool to be able show your kids and grandkids that you are able to trace your own generation-by-generation ancestral pathways from
one of your ancestors directly into one of Shakespeare’s most famous plays?

This may be the ancestral history eBook with which you can do just that. At least hundreds of millions of living people are descended from the
subject of this book. If you have any European ancestry within the last five centuries, you are probably one of them.

The magnitude of The Family Forest® Descendants of King Duncan I of Scotland is staggering. It is 25,209 pages in length, and includes
216,538 different people, some of whom are themselves the ancestors of many millions of people.

The complete contents of at least 17 other Family Forest® eBook titles (totalling over $340, see list below) are all contained in this one
eBook title. Some of the contents from hundreds of other Family Forest® eBook titles are also contained in this same eBook title.

This short video will give you a good idea of what you can expect to find in this eBook.

We are asking for pricing advice. $129 is what we are leaning toward now, and it seems like a bargain price, considering that it contains much more than $340 of ancestral history content, and it can be the gateway portal into an inspirational lifetime learning experience.

However, $129 is still $40 more than buying the entire Family Forest® National Treasure Edition. Anyone with a reasonably powerful computer can use the National Treasure to generate this eBook (plus many more), if they are willing to commit about a day and a half of computer time.

Do you have any pricing advice you are willing to share with us?

Whatever the price it is released at, the Antelope Valley Genealogy Society will be giving this Duncan I eBook download away as a door prize at their conference in October. 

P.S. This title may be an exception to Jeff Bezos’ claim to be able to deliver any eBook title within 60 seconds.

Corporal Roger Wellington

Earl Sir Thomas Boleyn

Gov. Simon Bradstreet

Gov. Thomas Dudley

John Whitney

King Edward III of England

King Robert I of Scotland

Lady Joan Beaufort

Lord Sir Oliver De St John

Rev. John Maverick

Rev. John Woodbridge

Richard Sears

Richard Warren

Roger Harlakenden

Samuel Appleton

Sir Richard Saltonstall

Thomas Ludlow


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Filed under A People-Centered Approach To History®, Amazon.com, Ancestors, Ancestral History, Ancestry, Cousins, Descendants, ebooks, Family Forest, Family Forest National Treasure, Family Forest® Project, Family History, FamilyForest.com, Genealogy, King Edward III of England, King Robert I of Scotland, National Treasure, Uncategorized

Wikipedia Attacks Knowledge

A generally anonymous user at Wikipedia instigated a deletion of the Family Forest® page which had been up since January of 2007 at Wikipedia, and it feels like a malicious attack. So why now and what was the motivation?

What was the real agenda of this person? It appears that he or she doesn’t know what the Family Forest® is, but was sure that it doesn’t deserve recognition. Or could he or she have known what the Family Forest® is, and was carrying out sabotage orders?

Allegedly the Family Forest® fails Wikipedia’s Notability test.  Doesn’t it seem that a system of digital links which can generate tens of billions of pages of high quality ancestral history charts, ebooks, and reports should be considered notable, and a system of digital links which can map out a larger portion of the early ancestral pathways than they can see anywhere else for at least one out of three people on the planet should be considered notable?

In the deletion discussion (which I did not know was going on at the time) I was dismissed as just a genealogy hobbyist. On a typical day now, I can substantially improve the assembled ancestry of tens of millions of living people. This is possible only with the proprietary digital resource (the Family Forest®) I have spent tens of thousands of hours developing.

Someone who has spent 40 to 80 hours per week almost every week for 16 years digitally indexing human history in lineage-linked format should not be dismissed as just a hobbyist.

One of our investors recommends legal counsel (and possible action) to find out if this anonymous, mean-spirited, and unfounded attack, and Wikipedia’s decision to delete the entry without bothering to make any notification to either the individual who wrote and updated annually the entry on the Family Forest®, nor to the company, which is easily contacted from the FamilyForest.com website, is actionable in a court of law as it is quite damaging to the company, scurrilous, and possibly backed by some would be competitor seeking a corporate advantage.

We don’t want to do that. We don’t want to counterattack. There’s a lot I like about Wikipedia, and I have trouble believing that most of the people behind Wikipedia would sanction the wrong that was done to us.

So here is an offer I presented to Wikimedia last week for a win-win solution. If they will reexamine the Family Forest deletion decision, for the next 120 days they can make the following available at Wikipedia.

Every person who contributes $25 to Wikipedia will receive a complimentary $49 download of the 10,142 page Family Forest® Descendants of King Edward III of England eBook.

Exploring this one huge eBook should convince almost anyone that this one title by itself is notable. Since it is like but one grain of sand on the beach compared to all of the titles the Family Forest® can generate, it should be obvious that the Family Forest® should easily pass Wikipedia’s Notability test.

We are still waiting for Wikimedia to respond to our offer. If they have not accepted by the end of this week, we will offer it to the American Red Cross instead.

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Filed under American Red Cross, Ancestral History, Ancestry, ebooks, Family Forest, Family Forest® Project, Family History, FamilyForest.com, Genealogy, King Edward III of England, Notability, Wikimedia, Wikipedia

Explaining the Unbelievable

On his 84th birthday I ran a Family Forest® kinship report for my Dad. How do I explain that amazing report? It shows results that a lifetime of learning has taught all of us to believe is impossible.

The software searched through the entire system of digital links I’ve spent tens of thousands of hours assembling. It was looking for every person in the Family Forest® who, according to recorded history, is related to my father through either birth or marriage.

It took 5,823 pages to display the results. The report shows that my father has family ties to over a quarter million different relatives over thousands of years, and they include most of the key people who were at most of the pivotal places and events in human history, as well as many of the Hollywood celebrities who have portrayed much of that history on film.

For instance, there are 27 signers of the Declaration of Independence on this report. That’s only one person short of half of the heroic men who signed. How can this be?

Well the simple explanation is that anyone who is connected into the Royal Channel in the Family Forest® is instantly networked through family ties to every other person who has already been connected into the Royal Channel.

Although my Dad is unique and very special to me, sociologically and genealogically speaking, he is an average everyday guy. With over a million boxes to fill in on their pedigree charts for just their first 20 generations, over time all average everyday people are descended from a number of the same ancestors famous people are descended from.

This is a message I have to deliver. It sounds simple, even though it runs contrary to common knowledge and it still seems unbelievable.

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Filed under Ancestral History, education, Family, Family Forest, Family Forest National Treasure, Family Forest® Project, Genealogy

Texas Heroes and Google Books

I’d like to share a fascinating ancestral history gem I discovered at Google Books this week. 

It involves early Texas heroes, and the essence of it has now been digitally lineage-linked in the Family Forest® to a more recent national hero from Texas. Literally millions of people, including probably you (I know I am one of them), relate to this story through their own family ties. 

Audie Murphy was a national hero from Texas, the most decorated American soldier in World War II. His biography, No Name on the Bullet, mentions that his family tree included such men as one of his great-grandfathers, John Berry, but gives no identifying details about John Berry or what he did. So I turned to Google Books in search of answers.

I found more than I was hoping for. It was hidden in a book from 1900 by A. W. Sowell titled Early Settlers and Indian Fighters of Southwest Texas. 

Within a six-page section about John Berry’s wife (titled Mrs. Hannah Berry) are details about who he was, what he did, and in particular the noteworthy service he performed for Davy Crockett shortly before the Alamo. But it was a statement about his wife, also an ancestor of Audie Murphy, which caught my attention. 

While she was still alive, Grandma Berry is said to have had “seventy-four grandchildren that she knows of, and one hundred and twenty-four great-grandchildren, and two great-great-grandchildren.” 

We now know what the author A. W. Sowell could not know; a half century later, Grandma Berry would become an ancestor of at least one Hollywood actor, the most decorated American soldier in World War II. 

How many thousands (tens of thousands?) of living descendants might Grandma Berry have now, a full century after she finished her historically eventful and productive life in Texas at the age of 91? How many of her descendants do not yet know of their own family ties to her, the Alamo, and Audie Murphy?

The National Treasure Hunt begins in Texas. See for yourself.

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Filed under A People-Centered Approach To History®, Ancestors, Ancestral History, Ancestry, Audie Murphy, Family Forest National Treasure, Family Forest® Project, Family Trees, Genealogy, Google, history, Hollywood, National Treasure, Texas, World War II

Jack Nicholson’s Cousins and the Emmy Awards

Jack Nicholson has some known cousins who have been nominated for an Emmy at the 62nd Emmy Awards, according to his Family Forest® relationship report.

These Emmy nominees include Glenn Close, Ted Danson, John Lithgow, Sissy Spacek, Alec Baldwin, and Georgia O’Keeffe (although she’s not up for an Emmy, the movie Georgia O’Keeffe is).

Certainly you will find Jack’s Family Forest® relationship report quite fascinating. After tens of thousands of hours of connecting the dots of recorded history, I can ask the computer for a list of all of the people that Jack has been linked to and Voila! (after a couple of hours of calulation and formating), a 5,715-page report appears with the names of over a quarter of a million different people from the last few thousands years of human history who are related to Jack.

Finding President Obama, myself, and over 1,200 knights that Jack is descended from or related to seems amazing enough, but you may be more interested in his family ties to the Hollywood community, both past and present.

Within this one computer-generated report, which spokes out with Jack at the hub, are thousands of well-known people who have profile pages at IMDb.com, and a surprising number of them have worked with him during his career on many popular films.

I found the main star from his upcoming film How Do You Know, one of the main stars from Something’s Gotta Give, two stars from The Departed, two stars from Mars Attacks!, China Kantner from The Evening Star, his co-star from Ironweed, a co-star from The Witches of Eastwick, the producer of The Shining, the author of One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, and both of the co-stars from Easy Rider.

The Family Forest® Project is, among other objectives, Networking Family History with Hollywood (TM).

Are you or any of your ancestors, or some of your favorite Hollywood stars, already networked to Jack Nicholson in the Family Forest? You can find out now.

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Filed under 62nd Emmy Awards, Cousins, Emmy Awards, Family Forest, Family Forest® Project, Genealogy, Hollywood, Jack Nicholson, Ted Danson

Chelsea Clinton Family Forest Kinship

Being curious about Chelsea’s big wedding event this weekend, we wondered how many of her Family Forest relatives might be attending. So we ran a Family Forest kinship report to see who she is known to be related to so far, and we posted the celebrity-studded report at our website.

No surprise that the results include one US President and one US Senator, but the report also contains another US Senator, a US Secretary of the Treasury, a Canadian Prime Minister, and one member of the British Royal Family.

In addition there are one famous author, one famous economist, the Dionne quintuplets, two Grammy-winning singing stars and two other equally well-known performers, and a number of other Hollywood celebrities including two famous directors, one of the most famous Hollywood actresses today, three Oscar-winning actors, and a couple of other equally well-known actors.

We’re waiting to see how many of them attend the event at Astor Courts.

Best wishes to Chelsea on her special day.

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Filed under Ancestors, Ancestral History, Ancestry, Astor Courts, Chelsea Clinton, Family Forest, Genealogy, Hollywood, Uncategorized, wedding, White House

Lena Horne, A tribute

Lena Horne died on May 9, 2010. In tribute to Lena Horne Time online wrote about her as more than a very talented woman and incredible entertainer of her day.

She is one of the many Hollywood connections in our Family Forest® National Treasure.

As a Family Forest® Tribute to Lena Horne here is her hourglass chart.

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Filed under Ancestors, Family Forest, Family Forest National Treasure, Genealogy, Hollywood, Lena Horne

Major Expansion of Family History eBook Library Underway

We have been having alot of fun creating these books for you. Here’s today’s press release announcing them. Enjoy the video snippets below to see the bigger picture!

Cyberspace April 12, 2010 

Family Forest® genealogy eBooks are digital tour guides to ancestral history. They will become a favorite part of the future of family history research. They lead readers to a wealth of essential best-of-the-best gems of their family heritage knowledge that are waiting to be discovered in previously recorded ancestral history. 

Almost every title relates personally to more that one million living people, and some titles relate personally to more that one billion living people. Almost every title lays out generation-by-generation family ties leading from the subject to mostly everyday people, as well as instantly recognizable historical figures and present day celebrities. 

Some of these titles have been already been submitted to the upcoming Google Editions program and many more are now available for downloading at familyforest.com

New editions of three hundred previous Family Forest® descendant series eBook titles created from the new Family Forest® National Treasure Edition, have just become available for instant download. Some of these titles have quadrupled in size from their earlier edition. 

Two hundred never-before-seen titles have already been created and will soon be available for instant download. Some are already available. Many more additional titles will be following. 

In addition to a number of other objectives, the Family Forest® Project is Networking Family History with Hollywood™ (video example 1 )and ( video example 2 ) better than any other resource, either online or offline, as can be seen in the new Family Forest® National Treasure Edition

Family Forest® ancestral history eBooks are priced from $5.95 to $49.95. 

Family Forest® is a registered trademark of Millisecond Publishing Company, Inc. 

Millisecond Publishing Company, Inc.

www.familyforest.com

www.familyforest.wordpress.com

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Filed under A People-Centered Approach To History®, Ancestral History, ebooks, Family Forest National Treasure, Family Forest® Project, Genealogy, Google, history, King Edward III of England, Mayflower Pilgrims